Loading up on books

Some bought and some borrowed from our friendly neighbourhood library.

 

Lonely Planet’s Nepali Phrasebook
by Mary-Jo O’Rourke and Bimal Man Shrestha
Lonely Planet; 5 edition (Jul 1 2008)

Nepali is spoken by some 35 million people, so if you don’t get on board with the language, imagine all the restaurant recommendations you’ll miss out on. It’s okay, the Nepali phrasebook is here. You’ll be fine. – Lonely Planet

Himalya
by Michael Palin and Basil Pao
Thomas Dunne Books (June 2005)

Himalaya with Michael Palin was a 2004 BBC television series presented by comedian and travel presenter Michael Palin. It records his six-month trip around the Himalaya mountain range area. The trip covered only 3,000 miles (4,800 km) horizontally, but involved a lot of vertical traveling, including several treks up into the mountains. The highest point attained by Michael Palin was Everest Base Camp at 17,500 feet (5,300 meters). – Wikepedia

A Course in Nepali
By David Matthews (1998)

Nepali, the official language of the Kingdom of Nepal, is widely spoken throughout the Eastern Himalayas, where it functions as one of the major vehicles of communication. Nepali has also been adopted by peoples of the Himalayan region who belong to different linguistic groups, and is now understood throughout the whole of Nepal, the Darjeeling region of West Bengal, Sikkim, Bhutan and parts of Tibet, where it has functioned as a language of trade and commerce for well over two centuries. The aim of this course, which covers the whole grammar and all the constructions of modern Nepali, is to present a full description of both the spoken and written forms of modern standard Nepali, and to enable the student to understand, speak and read most types of Nepali he or she is likely to encounter.  – Google Book Search

Teach Yourself Nepali Complete Course
Michael Hutt and Abhi Subedi (2004)

Prepared by experts in the language, each course begins with the basics and steadily promotes the student to a level of smooth and confident communication – Amazon.ca

Lonely Planet Nepal
by Bradley Mayhew, Joe Bindloss, Stan Armington (2006)

Shangri-la exists. Trek to the top of the world, or share a smile with a Buddhist monk; raft down a mountain gorge, or glimpse a living Hindu goddess – in Nepal adventure and culture go hand in hand. With this definitive guide, you’ll tread lightly through the best of the Himalaya. – Lonely Planet

Lonely Planet Bhutan
by Lindsay Brown, Bradley Mayhew, Stan Armington (2007)
Bhutan is next door, to the east of Nepal.

Bhutan, the ‘Land of the Thunder Dragon’, is no ordinary place. This is a country where billboards are illegal, the rice is pink and there are wildlife sanctuaries for the migoi (the Bhutanese yeti). – Lonely Planet

Thoughts?